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Ingredients & Nutrition Facts

Protein ] Starches & Grains ] [ Fruits ] Green Vegetables ] Spices ] Herbs ] Condiments ] For Acquired Taste ]

Fruits

 

Durian (sầu ring)

The fruit can grow up to 30 centimetres (12 in) long and 15 centimetres (6 in) in diameter, and typically weighs one to three kilograms (2 to 7 lb). Its shape ranges from oblong to round, the colour of its husk green to brown and its flesh pale-yellow to red, depending on species. The hard outer husk is covered with sharp, prickly thorns, while the edible custard-like flesh within emits the strong, distinctive odour, which is regarded as either fragrant or overpowering and offensive. The taste of the flesh has been described as nutty and sweet.

Durian fruit contains a high amount of sugar, vitamin C, potassium, and the serotoninergic amino acid tryptophan, and is a good source of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. It is recommended as a good source of raw fats by several raw food advocates, while others classify it as a high-glycemic or high-fat food, recommending to minimise its consumption.

In Malaysia, a decoction of the leaves and roots used to be prescribed as an antipyretic. The leaf juice is applied on the head of a fever patient.The most complete description of the medicinal use of the durian as remedies for fevers is a Malay prescription, collected by Burkill and Haniff in 1930. It instructs the reader to boil the roots of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis with the roots of Durio zibethinus, Nephelium longan, Nephelium mutabile and Artocarpus integrifolia, and drink the decoction or use it as a poultice.

Jackfruit (mt)

The fruit is huge, seldom less than about 25 cm in diameter. The jackfruit is something of an acquired taste, but it is very popular in many parts of the world. An unopened ripe fruit can have a unpleasant smell, like rotting onions. The lightbrown to black seeds with white innards are indeed about the size of dates. In the United States and Europe, the fruit is available in shops that sell exotic products, usually sold canned with a sugar syrup or frozen. It is also obtained fresh from Asian food markets. Sweet jackfruit chips are also often available.

The fruit comes in three types, all with leathery, slightly leafy skin:

The fruit can weigh from 150-600 grams and the flesh, which is eaten raw, is mildly sweet and low in calories. Eating the fruit is sometimes likened to that of the kiwifruit due to a prevalence of sesame seed-sized black crunchy seeds found in the flesh of both fruits which make for a similar texture upon consumption. The fruit may be converted into juice or wine; the flowers can be eaten or steeped as tea. Although the tiny pitaya seeds are eaten with the flesh, the seeds are indigestible.

Pitaya - dragon fruit (thanh long)
  • The red flesh variety is rich in antioxidants.
  • The pitaya fruit is rich in vitamins.
  • The pitaya fruit helps the digestive process due to its fiber.
  • The pitaya fruit helps prevent colon cancer and diabetes.
  • The pitaya fruit helps to neutralize toxic substances such as heavy metal, reduce cholesterol levels and high blood pressure.
  • Consumed regularly the pitaya fruit can help against asthma and cough.

Dragonfruit is rich in fiber, Vitamin C and minerals. The typical nutritional value per 100g of dragonfruit is as follows:

Dragonfruit is also rich in phytoalbumins which are highly valued for their antioxidant properties. Antioxidants prevent the formation of cancer-causing free radicals. In Taiwan, diabetics use the fruit as a food substitute for rice and as a source of dietary fiber.

The nutrition  per 100 grams of lychee fruit:

  • calories: 66

  • carbohydrates: 16.53 g

  • lipids (fat): .44 g

  • fiber: 1.3 g

  • sugars: 15.23 g

  • calcium: 5 mg

  • magnesium: 10 mg

  • potassium: 171 mg

  • phosphorus: 31 mg

  • vitamin c: 71.5 mg

Lychee (vải)

The fruit is a drupe, 34 cm long and 3 cm in diameter. The outside is covered by a red, roughly-textured rind that is inedible but easily removed. The inside consists of a layer of sweet, translucent white flesh, rich in vitamin C, with a texture somewhat similar to that of a grape. The edible flesh consists of a highly developed aril enveloping the seed. The center contains a single glossy brown nut-like seed, 2 cm long and 11.5 cm in diameter. The seed, similar to a buckeye seed, is slightly poisonous and should not be eaten. Lychees are commonly sold fresh in Chinese and Asian markets, and in recent years, also widely in supermarkets worldwide. The red rind turns dark brown when the fruit is refrigerated, but the taste is not affected. It is also sold canned year-round. The fruit can be dried with the rind intact, at which point the flesh shrinks and darkens, somewhat resembling a human earlobe in texture.

Longan (nhn)

The longan ("dragon eyes") is so named because of the fruit's resemblance to an eyeball when it is shelled (the black seed shows through the translucent flesh like a pupil/iris).

The fruit is edible, and is often used in East Asian soups, snacks, desserts, and sweet-and-sour foods. They are round with a thin, brown-coloured inedible shell. The flesh of the fruit, which surrounds a big, black seed, is translucent white, soft, and juicy.

Longans and lychees bear fruit at around the same time of the year. Dried longan (Chinese: 圓肉; Pinyin: yunru; literally "round meat") are often used in Chinese cuisine, Chinese food therapy and herbal medicine and Chinese sweet desert soups. In contrast with the fresh fruit, the flesh of dried longans is dark brown to almost black.

 

Rambutan (chm chm)

The fruit is a round to oval drupe 3-6 cm (rarely to 8 cm) long and 3-4 cm broad, borne in a loose pendant cluster of 10-20 together. The leathery skin is reddish (rarely orange or yellow), and covered with fleshy pliable spines, hence the name rambutan, derived from the Malay word rambut which means hairs. The fruit flesh is translucent, whitish or very pale pink, with a sweet, mildly acidic flavour.

The single seed is glossy brown, 2-3 cm long, with a white basal scar; it is poisonous and should not be eaten with the fruit flesh.

 

Mango (tri xoi)

. The mango fruit is a drupe; when mature, it hangs from the tree on long stems. They are variable in size, from 10-25 cm long and 7-12 cm diameter, and may weigh up to 2.5 kg. The ripe fruit is variably colored yellow, orange and red, reddest on the side facing the sun and yellow where shaded; green usually indicates that the fruit is not yet ripe, but this depends on the cultivar. The fruit flesh of a ripe mango contains about 15% sugar, up to 1% protein, and significant amounts of vitamins A, B and C. It is very sweet, with a unique taste. The texture of the flesh varies markedly between different cultivars; some have quite a soft and pulpy texture similar to an over-ripe plum, while others have a firmer flesh much like that of a cantaloupe or avocado, and in some cultivars the flesh can contain fibrous material.

Mangosteen (măng cụt)

 The edible endocarp of the mangosteen is botanically defined as an aril with the same shape and size as a tangerine 4-6 cm in diameter, but is white. The circle of wedge-shaped arils contains 4-8 segments, the larger ones harboring apomictic seeds that are unpalatable unless roasted. Since 2004, mangosteen has been included among an emerging category of novel functional foods sometimes called "superfruits" presumed to have a combination of 1) appealing subjective characteristics, such as taste, fragrance and visual qualities, 2) nutrient richness, 3) antioxidant strength and 4) potential impact for lowering risk against human diseases. When analyzed specifically for its edible aril, however, mangosteen meets only the first criterion above, as its overall nutrient profile is absent of important content.

Guava (ổi)

The fruit is edible, round to pear-shaped, from 3-10 cm in diameter (to 12 cm in some selected cultivars). It has a thin delicate rind, pale green to yellow at maturity in some species, pink to red in others, a creamy white or orange-salmon flesh with many small hard seeds, and a strong, characteristic aroma. It is rich in vitamins A, B, and C (a guava fruit contains more vitamin C than a typical citrus fruit the rind contains over five times more vitamin C than an orange). It also contains high amounts of calcium which is unusual in a fruit. Guava leaves are used for medicinal purposes, as a remedy for diarrhea, and for their supposed antimicrobial properties. The same anti-diarrheal substances which are useful in folk medicine may also cause constipation in the case of consumption of large amounts of guava fruits. In Cuba their leaves are also used in barbecues providing a nice smoked flavor and scent to the meat. In recent studies, Guava is believed to have sugar lowering properties to help diabetics lower their sugar count. While testing is not fully conclusive, results have been promising as a natural means to help diabetics combat high sugar

Sweetsop (na/mng cầu)

The fruit is usually round or oval, slightly pine cone-like, 6-10 cm diameter and weighing 100-230 g, with a scaly or lumpy skin. The fruit flesh is edible, white to light yellow, and resembles and tastes like custard. The seeds are scattered through the fruit flesh; they are blackish-brown, 12-18 mm long, and hard and shiny.

It is used by some societies in India to prepare a hair tonic. The seeds are also ground and applied to rid the hair of lice.

Soursop (mng cầu xim)

Comparisons of its flavor range from strawberry and pineapple mixed together to sour citrus flavour notes contrasting with an underlying creamy roundness of flavour reminiscent of coconut or banana. The fruit is somewhat difficult to eat, as the white interior pulp is studded with many large seeds, and pockets of soft flesh are bounded by fibrous membranes. The soursop is therefore usually juiced rather than eaten directly. 

Nutritionally, the fruit is high in carbohydrates, particularly fructose. The fruit also contains significant amounts of vitamin C, vitamin B1, and vitamin B2. The fruit, seeds, and leaves have a number of herbal medicinal uses among indigenous peoples of regions where the plant is common. The tea, fruit, and juice are used medicinally to treat illness ranging from stomach ailments to worms.

Water apple (mận)

The fruit is a bell-shaped edible berry, with colors ranging from white, pale green, green, red, purple, crimson, to deep purple or even black, 4-6 cm long in wild plants.

In the Pacific Islands, this fruit is known as Mountain Apple. In the Fiji Islands it is common in the outskirts of forests. Called "Kavika" in Fiji, it is well-documented as a medicinal plant (particularly the bark of the Kavika tree).

Individuals with kidney trouble should avoid consuming the fruit, due to the presence of oxalic acid. Juice made from carambola can be even more dangerous due to its concentration of the acid. Those with high cholesterol or are diabetic should also avoid this fruit, due to its high amount of sugar.

Star fruit (khế)

Its fruit, the carambola, more popularly known as star fruit, but also coromandel gooseberry or kamranga, is a golden-yellow to green berry. When cut across it shows a 5-pointed (sometimes 6-pointed or 7-pointed) star shape, hence the name, "star fruit." Star fruits are crunchy, and have a slightly tart, acidic, sweet taste, reminiscent of pears, apples, and sometimes grapes. The fruits are a good source of vitamin C. Its seeds are small and brown. They consist of a tough outer skin and a tangy white inside.

There are two varieties of star fruit - acidulate and sweet. The tart varieties can often be identified by their narrowly spaced ribs. The sweet varieties usually have thick fleshy ribs.

The fruit starts out green, and goes to yellow as it ripens, though it can be eaten in both stages.

Watermelon (dưa hấu)

 The watermelon fruit, loosely considered a type of melon (although not in the genus Cucumis), has a smooth exterior rind (green and yellow) and a juicy, sweet, usually red or yellow, but sometimes orange, interior flesh. The flesh consists of highly developed placental tissue within the fruit. A one-cup serving of watermelon will provide around 48 calories. Watermelon is an excellent source of vitamin C and vitamin A, with one serving containing 14.59 mg of vitamin C and 556.32 IU of vitamin A. Watermelon also provides significant amounts of vitamin B6 and vitamin B1, as well as the minerals potassium and magnesium. Pink watermelon is also a source of the potent carotenoid antioxidant, lycopene.

Watermelon rinds are also edible, and sometimes used as a vegetable. In China, they are stir-fried, stewed, or more often pickled. When stir-fried, the de-skinned and de-fruited rind is cooked with olive oil, garlic, chili peppers, scallions, sugar and rum. Watermelon seeds are rich in fat and protein, and are widely eaten as a snack, added to other dishes, or used as an oilseed. Specialized varieties are grown which have little watery flesh but concentrate their energy into seed production.

Langsat (bn bon)

The skin is yellow to brown and often spotted, with a smooth and waxy texture. When peeled away, it reveals separate slices of sweet translucent meat, which contains bitter seeds that are not eaten.

Acerola (x-ri)

The fruit is bright red, 1.5-2 cm diameter, containing 2-3 hard seeds. It is juicy, often as much sour as sweet in flavor, and very high in vitamin C and other nutrients. Although resembling a cherry, it is unrelated to the true cherry

The fruit is edible and widely consumed in the species' native area, and is cultivated elsewhere for its high vitamin C content.

Sapodilla (hồng xim/xa-p-ch)

The fruit is a large globose berry, 4-8 cm in diameter, very much resembling a smooth-skinned potato and containing 2-10 seeds. Inside, its flesh ranges from a pale yellow to an earthy brown color with a grainy texture akin to that of a well-ripened pear. The flavour is exceptionally sweet and quite delicious. The seeds are black and resemble beans, with a hook at one end that can catch in the throat if swallowed.

Pomelo (bưởi)

 The pulp colour ranges between clear pale yellow to pink to red, and tastes like a sweet, mild grapefruit. It is the largest citrus fruit, growing as large as 30 cm in diameter and weighing as much as 10 kg; the peel is thick, and is sometimes used to make marmalade. The grapefruit is a hybrid between the pomelo and the orange. In some markets, grapefruits or pomelo/grapefruit crosses will also be sold as pomelo or pummelo. The tangelo is a hybrid between the pomelo and the tangerine. It has a thicker skin than a tangerine and is less sweet. The peel of the pomelo is also used in Chinese cooking or candied. In general, citrus peel is often used in southern Chinese cuisine for flavouring, especially in sweet soup desserts.

Spondias cytherea; see Spondias genus (cc)

The fruit is a drupe similar to a small mango (in the related genus Mangifera), 4-10 cm long, ripening yellow or orange.

About 10 species of Spondias bear edible fruits and have been domesticated for fruit production. The fruit has a single seed.

 

Green star apple (v sữa)

It has round, purple-skinned fruit that is often green around the calyx, with a star pattern in the pulp. Sometimes there is a greenish-white variety of the fruit. The skin is rich in latex, and both it and the rind are not edible. The flattened seeds are light brown and hard. It bears fruit year around after it reaches about seven years of age. The fruits are delicious as a fresh dessert fruit; it is sweet and best served chilled. The flattened seeds are light brown and hard. Infusions of the leaves have been used against diabetes and articular rheumatism. The bark is considered a tonic and stimulant, and a bark decoction is used as an antitussive. The fruit also exist in two colors, dark purple and greenish brown. The purple fruit has a more dense skin and texture while the greenish brown fruit has a thin skin and a more liquid pulp.

Persimmon (hồng)

Commercially, there are generally two types of persimmon fruit; astringent and non-astringent. Astringent persimmons contain very high levels of soluble tannins and are unpalatable if eaten before ripening. The astringency of tannins is removed by ripening by exposure to light over several days, or artificially with chemicals. This bletting process is sometimes jumpstarted by exposing the fruit to cold or frost which hastens cellular wall breakdown. These astringent persimmons can also be prepared for commercial purposes by drying. Non-astringent persimmons are not actually free of tannins as the term suggests, but rather are far less astringent before ripening, and lose more of their tannic quality sooner. Non-astringent persimmons may be consumed when still very firm to very very soft.

  • In traditional Chinese medicine the fruit regulates ch'i
  • The raw fruit is used to treat constipation, hemorrhoids, and to stop bleeding. As such, it is not a good idea to consume too many persimmons at once- they can induce diarrhea.
  • The cooked fruit is used to treat diarrhea and dysentery
Papaya (đu đủ)

 The fruit's taste is vaguely similar to pineapple, although much milder, creamier, and more fragrant, with a texture of slightly over-ripened cantaloupe. The primary use of the papaya is as an edible fruit. The ripe fruit is usually eaten raw, without the skin or seeds. The unripe green fruit of papaya can be eaten cooked, usually in curries, salads and stews. The black seeds are edible and have a sharp, spicy taste. They are sometimes ground up and used as a substitute for black pepper. In some parts of Asia the young leaves of papaya are steamed and eaten like spinach.

Women in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and other parts of the world have long used papaya as a folk remedy for contraception and abortion.[citation needed] Medical research in animals has confirmed the contraceptive and abortifacient capability of papaya, and also found that papaya seeds have contraceptive effects in adult male langur monkeys, possibly in adult male humans as well. Unripe papaya is especially effective in large amounts or high doses. Papaya is not teratogenic and will not cause miscarriage in small, ripe amounts. Phytochemicals in papaya may suppress the effects of progesterone.

Buddha's hand (phật thủ)

The fruit itself is a type of citron and is often described as lemon-like. The fruit is segmented into finger-like sections. It has a thick peel and a small amount of acidic flesh and is seedless and juiceless. It is very fragrant and is used predominantly by the Chinese and Japanese for perfuming rooms and personal items, such as clothing.

The peel of the fruit can be candied. In Western cooking, it is often used for its zest. The inner white pith is not bitter as is usually the case with citrus, so the fingers may be cut off and then longitudinally sliced, peel pith and all, and used in salads or scattered over cooked foods such as fish.

 

Rose apple (gioi in the North, mận Đ Lạt in the South)

There are several varieties, including the one most common in Thailand bearing a pale green fruit, and Malaysian varieties with red skin. It is often some shade of dull yellow. The skin is thin and waxy, and the hollow core contains a small amount of inedible fluff. The flesh is a bit softer than that of an apple. It tastes like a cross between apple and watermelon, with a very mild rose scent and a slightly bitter aftertaste.

   
 
Home page Vietnamese Dessert As Health Food Vietnamese Cuisine Cooking Utensil
Diet & Fitness Popular Dish Nutrition Asian Grocery Online Eat & Travel in Vietnam Vietnamese Recipe Search
History of Vietnamese Food Vietnamese Beauty- Beautify With Food Ingredients & Nutrition Vietnamese Food Calories Restaurant Search
Cooking tips Restaurant Menu Using Cooking Oil Using Herbs- Spices Grocery search
How to Cook Beef How to Cook Shrimp How to Cook Pork How to Cook Fish How to Cook Chicken
Food to Enhance Look Bizarre food of Vietnam Vietnamese Dance/ Performing Arts Vietnamese food Video Clips Visit XUVN.COM for More Insight of Vietnam
 
Vietnamese Culture Vietnamese Society Vietnam Towns in America Asian Communities in America Vietnam Headline News
Vietnamese Dating Dating Race Factor Dating in Vietnam Online Dating Sites Popular Vietnamese Dating Sites
Vietnamese Art Vietnamese Dance/ Performing Arts Vietnamese Singers  Modern/Contemporary Vietnamese Music Vietnamese Religion & Beliefs
Vietnamese Music  Vietnamese Musicians   Vietnamese Music Overview Vietnamese Traditional   Music Modern/Contemporary Vietnamese Music
Vietnam Tourism Overview Vietnam Picture Tour Picture Tour Show Vietnamese Legends & Folklores Vietnamese Classical Literature
Vietnam Travel Guide Vietnamese Clothing Video about Vietnam Vietnamese Religion & Beliefs Vietnamese Music & Performing Arts 
Vietnamese History Vietnam History Vietnamese Language Vietnamese Cosmetic Surgery Vietnamese Classical Literature
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Vietnamese Feast Vietnamese Names Vietnam Tourism Everything You want to Know to get FIT Fitness Activities Guide

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